Posts belonging to Category electronics



DNA Origami, The New Revolution To Come For Nanotechnology

For the past few decades, some scientists have known the shape of things to come in nanotechnology is tied to the molecule of life, DNA. This burgeoning field is called “DNA origami.” The moniker is borrowed from the art of conjuring up birds, flowers and other shapes by imaginatively folding a single sheet of paper. Similarly, DNA origami scientists are dreaming up a variety of shapes — at a scale one thousand times smaller than a human hair — that they hope will one day revolutionize computing, electronics and medicine. Now, a team of Arizona State University and Harvard scientists has invented a major new advance in DNA nanotechnology. Dubbed “single-stranded origami” (ssOrigami), their new strategy uses one long noodle-like strand of DNA, or its chemical cousin RNA, that can self-fold — without even a single knot — into the largest, most complex structures to date. And the strands forming these structures can be made inside living cells or using enzymes in a test tube, allowing scientists the potential to plug-and-play with new designs and functions for nanomedicine: picture tiny nanobots playing doctor and delivering drugs within cells at the site of injury.

A DNA origami with an emoji-like smiley face

I think this is an exciting breakthrough, and a great opportunity for synthetic biology as well,” said Hao Yan, a co-inventor of the technology, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, and the Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences.

We are always inspired by nature’s designs to make information-carrying molecules that can self-fold into the nanoscale shapes we want to make,” he said.

As proof of concept, they’ve pushed the envelope to make 18 shapes, including emoji-like smiley faces, hearts and triangles, that significantly expand the design studio space and material scalability for so-called, “bottom-upnanotechnology.

Source: https://asunow.asu.edu/

Lenses Provide Nano Scale X-ray Microscopy

Scientists at DESY (Germany) have developed novel lenses that enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution in the nanometre regime. Using new materials, the research team led by DESY scientist Saša Bajt from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has perfected the design of specialised X-ray optics and achieved a focus spot size with a diameter of less than ten nanometres. A nanometre is a millionths of a millimetre and is smaller than most virus particles. They successfully used their lenses to image samples of marine plankton.

Modern particle accelerators provide ultra-bright and high-quality X-ray beams. The short wavelength and the penetrating nature of X-rays are ideal for the microscopic investigation of complex materials. However, taking full advantage of these properties requires highly efficient and almost perfect optics in the X-ray regime. Despite extensive efforts worldwide this turned out to be more difficult than expected, and achieving an X-ray microscope that can resolve features smaller than 10 nm is still a big challenge.

 

The silica shell of the diatom Actinoptychus senarius, measuring only 0.1 mm across, is revealed in fine detail in this X-ray hologram recorded at 5000-fold magnification with the new lenses. The lenses focused an X-ray beam to a spot of approximately eight nanometres diameter – smaller than a single virus – which then expanded to illuminate the diatom and form the hologram

The new lenses consist of over 10 000 alternating layers of a new material combination, tungsten carbide and silicon carbide. “The selection of the right material pair was critical for the success,” emphasises Bajt. “It does not exclude other material combinations but it is definitely the best we know now.” The resolution of the new lenses is about five times better than achievable with typical state-of-the-art lenses.

We produced the world’s smallest X-ray focus using high efficiency lenses,” says Bajt. The new lenses have an efficiency of more than 80 per cent. This high efficiency is achieved with the layered structures that make up the lens and which act like an artificial crystal to diffract X-rays in a controlled way.

The researchers have reported their work in the journal Light: Science and Applications.

Source: http://www.desy.de/

Budweiser Orders 40 Tesla Electric Trucks

The list of companies placing orders for Tesla Semi electric trucks keeps growing weeks after the unveiling event last month. Now Anheuser-Busch, the brewer behind Budweiser, announced that it ordered 40 Tesla Semi trucks. Last week, DHL confirmed an order of 10 trucks – bringing the tally to just over 200 Tesla Semi trucks. The brewer says that it will include the electric trucks in its distribution network as part of its commitment to reduce its operational carbon footprint by 30 percent by 2025. Considering the size of their distribution network, they say that it would be the equivalent of removing nearly 500,000 cars from the road globally each year.

At Anheuser-Busch, we are constantly seeking new ways to make our supply chain more sustainable, efficient, and innovative. This investment in Tesla semi-trucks helps us achieve these goals while improving road safety and lowering our environmental impact,” commented James Sembrot, Senior Director of Logistics Strategy.

Tesla Semi is actually only one part of Anheuser-Busch’s effort to modernize its fleet. They also confirmed orders from Nikola Motors for their battery/fuel cell hydrogen trucks and Uber’s Otto autonomous trucks.

Last year, Uber’s Otto completed its first shipment by self-driving truck with an autonomous beer run with Budweiser.

Source: https://electrek.co/

3D-Printed Plastic Objects Connect To The Internet Without Any Electronics

Researchers from the University of Washington (UW) have developed 3D-printed plastic objects that can connect to the internet without any electronics or batteries. The researchers found a way to 3D-print plastic objects that can absorb or reflect ambient WiFi signals and send data wirelessly to any WiFi receiver like a smartphone or router.

Possible use cases include an attachment for laundry detergent that can sense when soap is running low, or a water sensor that notifies your smartphone when there is a leak.

As the UW explains in its news release, the researchers “replaced some functions normally performed by electrical components with mechanical motion activated by springs, gears, switches and other parts that can be 3-D printed — borrowing from principles that allow battery-free watches to keep time.” The scientists found that those mechanical motions can trigger gears and springs that connect to an antenna, all within the object.
The team opens new approach: “Can objects made of plastic materials be connected to smartphones and other Wi-Fi devices, without the need for batteries or electronics? A positive answer would enable a rich ecosystem of ‘talking objects3D printed with commodity plastic filaments that have the ability to sense and interact with their surroundings. Imagine plastic sliders or knobs that can enable rich physical interaction by dynamically sending information to a nearby Wi-Fi receiver to control music volume and lights in a room. This can also transform inventory management where for instance a plastic detergent bottle can self-monitor usage and re-order supplies via a nearby Wi-Fi device.
Such a capability democratizes the vision of ubiquitous connectivity by enabling designers to download and use our computational modules, without requiring the engineering expertise to integrate radio chips and other electronics in their physical creations. Further, as the commoditization of 3D printers continues, such a communication capability opens up the potential for individuals to print highly customized wireless sensors, widgets and objects that are tailored to their individual needs and connected to the Internet ecosystem
.”

Source: http://printedwifi.cs.washington.edu/
https://www.geekwire.com/

How To Trap DNA molecules With Your Smartphone

Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphenetiny electronictweezers” that can grab biomolecules floating in water with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phoneGraphene, a material made of a single layer of carbon atoms, was discovered more than a decade ago and has enthralled researchers with its range of amazing properties that have found uses in many new applications from microelectronics to solar cells. The graphene tweezers developed at the University of Minnesota are vastly more effective at trapping particles compared to other techniques used in the past due to the fact that graphene is a single atom thick, less than 1 billionth of a meter.

The physical principle of tweezing or trapping nanometer-scale objects, known as dielectrophoresis, has been known for a long time and is typically practiced by using a pair of metal electrodes. From the viewpoint of grabbing molecules, however, metal electrodes are very blunt. They simply lack the “sharpness” to pick up and control nanometer-scale objects.

Graphene is the thinnest material ever discovered, and it is this property that allows us to make these tweezers so efficient. No other material can come close,” said research team leader Sang-Hyun Oh, a Professor at the University of Minnesota. “To build efficient electronic tweezers to grab biomolecules, basically we need to create miniaturized lightning rods and concentrate huge amount of electrical flux on the sharp tip. The edges of graphene are the sharpest lightning rods.

The team also showed that the graphene tweezers could be used for a wide range of physical and biological applications by trapping semiconductor nanocrystals, nanodiamond particles, and even DNA molecules. Normally this type of trapping would require high voltages, restricting it to a laboratory environment, but graphene tweezers can trap small DNA molecules at around 1 Volt, meaning that this could work on portable devices such as mobile phones.

The research study has been published  in Nature Communications.

Source: https://cse.umn.edu/

Copycat Robot

Introducing T-HR3, third generation humanoid robot designed to explore how clever joints can improve brilliant balance and real remote controlToyota says its 29 joints allow it to copy the most complex of moves – safely bringing friendly, helpful robots one step closer.


CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO ENJOY THE VIDEO

Humanoid robots are very popular among Japanese people…creating one like this has always been our dream and that’s why we pursued it,” says Akifumi Tamaoki, manager of Partner robot division at Toyota.

The robot is controlled by a remote operator sitting in an exoskeletonmirroring its master’s moves, a headset giving the operator a realtime robot point of view.

We’re primarily focused on making this robot a very family-oriented one, so that it can help people including services such as carer” explains Tamaoki.
Toyota said T-HR3 could help around the homes or medical facilities in Japan or construction sites, a humanoid helping hand – designed for a population ageing faster than anywhere else on earth.

Source: http://toyota.com/

Nanotechnology Boosts CyberSecurity Against Hackers

The next generation of electronic hardware security may be at hand as researchers at New York University Tandon School of Engineering  (NYU Tandon) introduce a new class of unclonable cybersecurity security primitives made of a low-cost nanomaterial with the highest possible level of structural randomness. Randomness is highly desirable for constructing the security primitives that encrypt and thereby secure computer hardware and data physically, rather than by programming.

In a paper published in the journal ACS Nano, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Davood Shahrjerdi and his team at NYU Tandon offer the first proof of complete spatial randomness in atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). The researchers grew the nanomaterial in layers, each roughly one million times thinner than a human hair. By varying the thickness of each layer, Shahrjerdi explained, they tuned the size and type of energy band structure, which in turn affects the properties of the material.

(a) At monolayer thickness, this material has the optical properties of a semiconductor that emits light. At multilayer, the properties change and the material doesn’t emit light. (b) Varying the thickness of each layer results in a thin film speckled with randomly occurring regions that alternately emit or block light. (c) Upon exposure to light, this pattern can be translated into a one-of-a-kind authentication key that could secure hardware components at minimal cost.

This property is unique to this material,” underscores Shahrjerdi. By tuning the material growth process, the resulting thin film is speckled with randomly occurring regions that alternately emit or do not emit light. When exposed to light, this pattern translates into a one-of-a-kind authentication key that could secure hardware components at minimal cost.

Source: http://engineering.nyu.edu/

Artificial Intelligence Chip Analyzes Molecular-level Data In Real Time

Nano Global, an Austin-based molecular data company, today announced that it is developing a chip using intellectual property (IP) from Arm, the world’s leading semiconductor IP company. The technology will help redefine how global health challenges – from superbugs to infectious diseases, and cancer are conquered.

The pioneering system-on-chip (SoC) will yield highly-secure molecular data that can be used in the recognition and analysis of health threats caused by pathogens and other living organisms. Combined with the company’s scientific technology platform, the chip leverages advances in nanotechnology, optics, artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain authentication, and edge computing to access and analyze molecular-level data in real time.

In partnership with Arm, we’re tackling the vast frontier of molecular data to unlock the unlimited potential of this universe,” said Steve Papermaster, Chairman and CEO of Nano Global. “The data our technology can acquire and process will enable us to create a safer and healthier world.”

We believe the technology Nano Global is delivering will be an important step forward in the collective pursuit of care that improves lives through the application of technology,” explained Rene Haas, executive vice president and president of IPG, Arm. “By collaborating with Nano Global, Arm is taking an active role in developing and deploying the technologies that will move us one step closer to solving complex health challenges.”

Additionally, Nano Global will be partnering with several leading institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine and National University of Singapore, on broad research initiatives in clinical, laboratory, and population health environments to accelerate data collection, analysis, and product development.
The initial development of the chip is in process with first delivery expected by 2020. The company is already adding new partners to their platform.

Source: https://nanoglobal.com/
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Graphene Ripples, Clean And Limitless Energy Source

Graphene is a seemingly impossible material. For years, scientists had theorized that lifting a single layer of carbon atoms from a chunk of graphite could produce the first two-dimensional material, which they called graphene. Finally, in 2004, this was accomplished by two physicists at the University of Manchester, who earned the Nobel Prize in Physics for this breakthrough. There was a problem, however: two dimensional materials violate the laws of physics. Without the support of a substrate, physics predicts they would tear apart or melt, even at a temperature of absolute zero. Physicists had to find a loophole to explain their existence.

That loophole turned out to be related to a phenomenon known as Brownian motion, small random fluctuations of the carbon atoms that make up graphene. This causes the material to ripple into the third dimension, similar to waves moving across the surface of the ocean. These movements in and out of the flat surface allow graphene to stay comfortably within the laws of physics.

Ever since Robert Brown discovered Brownian motion in 1827, scientists have wondered whether they could harvest this motion as a source of energy. The research of Paul Thibado, professor of physics at the University of Arkansas, provides strong evidence that the motion of graphene could indeed be used as a source of clean, limitless energy. Other researchers have theorized that temperature-induced curvature inversion in graphene could be used as an energy source, and even predicted the amount of energy they could produce. What sets Thibado’s work apart is his discovery that graphene has naturally occurring ripples that invert their curvature as the atoms vibrate in response to the ambient temperature.

This is the key to using the motion of 2D materials as a source of harvestable energy,” Thibado said. Unlike atoms in a liquid, which move in a random directions, atoms connected in a sheet of graphene move together. This means their energy can be collected using existing nanotechnology.

These results have been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Source: https://researchfrontiers.uark.edu

New Quantum Computer Uses 10,000 Times Less Power

Japan has unveiled its first quantum computer prototype, amid a global race to build ever-more powerful machines with faster speeds and larger brute force that are key towards realising the full potential of artificial intelligence. Japan’s machine can theoretically make complex calculations 100 times faster than even a conventional supercomputer, but use just 1 kilowatt of power – about what is required by a large microwave oven – for every 10,000 kilowatts consumed by a supercomputer. Launched recently, the creators – the National Institute of Informatics, telecom giant NTT and the University of Tokyo – said they are building a cloud system to house their “quantum neural network” technology.

In a bid to spur further innovation, this will be made available for free to the public and fellow researchers for trials at https://qnncloud.com
The creators, who aim to commercialise their system by March 2020, touted its vast potential to help ease massive urban traffic congestion, connect tens of thousands of smartphones to different base stations for optimal use in a crowded area, and even develop innovative new drugs by finding the right combination of chemical compounds.

Quantum computers differ from conventional supercomputers in that they rely on theoretical particle physics and run on subatomic particles such as electrons in sub-zero temperatures. Most quantum computers, for this reason, destabilise easily and are error-prone, thereby limiting their functions.

We will seek to further improve the prototype so that the quantum computer can tackle problems with near-infinite combinations that are difficult to solve, even by modern computers at high speed,” said Stanford University Professor Emeritus Yoshihisa Yamamoto, who is heading the project.
Japan’s prototype taps into a 1km-long optical fibre cable packed with photons, and exploits the properties of light to make super-quick calculations. Its researchers said they deemed the prototype ready for public use, after tests showed that it was capable of operating stably around the clock at room temperature.

Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/

Printed 3D Nanostructures Against Counterfeiting

Security features are to protect bank notes, documents, and branded products against counterfeiting. Losses caused by product forgery and counterfeiting may be enormous. According to the German Engineering Association, the damage caused in 2016 in its branch alone amounted to EUR 7.3 billion. In the Advanced Materials Technologies journal, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the ZEISS company now propose to use printed 3D microstructures instead of 2D structures, such as holograms, to improve counterfeit protection.

Today, optical security features, such as holograms, are frequently based on two-dimensional microstructures,” says Professor Martin Wegener, expert for 3D printing of microstructures at the Institute of Nanotechnology of KIT. “By using 3D-printed fluorescent microstructures, counterfeit protection can be increased.” The new security features have a side length of about 100 µm and are barely visible with the eye or a conventional microscope. For their production and application, Wegener and his team have developed an innovative method that covers all processes from microstructure fabrication to the readout of information.

The microstructures consist of a 3D cross-grid scaffold and dots that fluoresce in different colors and can be arranged variably in three dimensions within this grid. To produce and print such microstructures, the experts use a rapid and precise laser lithography device developed and commercialized by the Nanoscribe company, a spinoff of KIT. It enables highly precise manufacture of voluminous structures of a few millimeters edge length or of microstructured surfaces of several cm² in dimension. The special 3D printer produces the structures layer by layer from non-fluorescent and two fluorescent photoresists. A laser beam very precisely passes certain points of the liquid photoresist. The material is exposed and hardened at the focus point of the laser beam. The resulting filigree structure is then embedded in a transparent polymer in order to protect it against damage.

Source: http://www.kit.edu/

How To Use Computers Heat To Generate Electricity

Electronic devices such as computers generate heat that mostly goes to waste. Physicists at Bielefeld University (Germany) have found a way to use this energy: They apply the heat to generate magnetic signals known as ‘spin currents’. In future, these signals could replace some of the electrical current in electronic components. In a new study, the physicists tested which materials can generate this spin current most effectively from heat. The research was carried out in cooperation with colleagues from the University of Greifswald, Gießen University, and the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research in Dresden.

The Bielefeld physicists are working on the basic principles for making data processing more effective and energy-efficient in the young field of ‘spin caloritronics’. They are members of the ‘Thin Films & Physics of Nanostructures’ research group headed by Professor Dr. Günter Reiss. Their new study determines the strength of the spin current for various combinations of thin films.

A spin current is produced by differences in temperature between two ends of an electronic component. These components are extremely small and only one millionth of a millimetre thick. Because they are composed of magnetic materials such as iron, cobalt, or nickel, they are called magnetic nanostructures.

The physicists take two such nanofilms and place a layer of metal oxide between them that is only a few atoms thick. They heat up one of the external films – for example, with a hot nanowire or a focused laser. Electrons with a specific spin orientation then pass through the metal oxide. This produces the spin current. A spin can be conceived as electrons spinning on their own axes – either clockwise or anti-clockwise.

Their findings have been  published  in the research journal ‘Nature Communications’.

Source: https://ekvv.uni-bielefeld.de/