Posts belonging to Category Health



DNA Origami, The New Revolution To Come For Nanotechnology

For the past few decades, some scientists have known the shape of things to come in nanotechnology is tied to the molecule of life, DNA. This burgeoning field is called “DNA origami.” The moniker is borrowed from the art of conjuring up birds, flowers and other shapes by imaginatively folding a single sheet of paper. Similarly, DNA origami scientists are dreaming up a variety of shapes — at a scale one thousand times smaller than a human hair — that they hope will one day revolutionize computing, electronics and medicine. Now, a team of Arizona State University and Harvard scientists has invented a major new advance in DNA nanotechnology. Dubbed “single-stranded origami” (ssOrigami), their new strategy uses one long noodle-like strand of DNA, or its chemical cousin RNA, that can self-fold — without even a single knot — into the largest, most complex structures to date. And the strands forming these structures can be made inside living cells or using enzymes in a test tube, allowing scientists the potential to plug-and-play with new designs and functions for nanomedicine: picture tiny nanobots playing doctor and delivering drugs within cells at the site of injury.

A DNA origami with an emoji-like smiley face

I think this is an exciting breakthrough, and a great opportunity for synthetic biology as well,” said Hao Yan, a co-inventor of the technology, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Molecular Design and Biomimetics, and the Milton Glick Professor in the School of Molecular Sciences.

We are always inspired by nature’s designs to make information-carrying molecules that can self-fold into the nanoscale shapes we want to make,” he said.

As proof of concept, they’ve pushed the envelope to make 18 shapes, including emoji-like smiley faces, hearts and triangles, that significantly expand the design studio space and material scalability for so-called, “bottom-upnanotechnology.

Source: https://asunow.asu.edu/

The Smell Of Death

Scientists in Korea have developed a bioelectronicnose’ that can specifically detect a key compound produced in decaying substances. When food begins to rot, the smell that we find repulsive comes from a compound known as cadaverine. That is also the substance responsible for the stench of rotting bodies, or cadavers—hence the name. The compound is the result of a bacterial reaction involving lysine, which is an amino acid commonly found in various food products. A previous study has shown that a receptor in zebrafish has an affinity for cadaverine. To make this receptor in the laboratory, scientists have turned to Escherichia coli bacteria as a host cell because it can easily produce large quantities of proteins. However, the production of this receptor in E. coli has been a challenge because it needs to be embedded in a membrane.

In this study, a team of researchers led by Associate Professor Hong Seunghun at Seoul National University packaged the cadaverine receptor from the zebrafish into nanodiscs, which are water friendly, membrane-like structures. The researchers then placed the receptor-containing nanodiscs in a special orientation on a carbon nanotube transistor, completing the bioelectronic nose. During testing with purified test compounds and real-world salmon and beef samples, the nose was selective and sensitive for cadaverine, even at low levels. The researchers suggest that the detector could someday prove useful in natural disaster scenarios, to recover corpses for identification.

The findings have been published in the journal ACS Nano.

Source: http://pubs.acs.org/

Paraplegic Rats Walk After Stem Cell Treatment

Engineered tissue containing human stem cells has allowed paraplegic rats to walk independently and regain sensory perception. The implanted rats also show some degree of healing in their spinal cords. The research, published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, demonstrates the great potential of stem cellsundifferentiated cells that can develop into numerous different types of cells—to treat spinal cord injury.

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Spinal cord injuries often lead to paraplegia. Achieving substantial recovery following a complete tear, or transection, is an as-yet unmet challenge.

Led by Dr. Shulamit Levenberg, of the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, the researchers implanted human stem cells into rats with a complete spinal cord transection. The stem cells, which were derived from the membrane lining of the mouth, were induced to differentiate into support cells that secrete factors for neural growth and survival.

The work involved more than simply inserting stem cells at various intervals along the spinal cord. The research team also built a three-dimensional scaffold that provided an environment in which the stem cells could attach, grow and differentiate into support cells. This engineered tissue was also seeded with human thrombin and fibrinogen, which served to stabilize and support neurons in the rat’s spinal cord.

Rats treated with the engineered tissue containing stem cells showed higher motor and sensory recovery compared to control rats. Three weeks after introduction of the stem cells, 42% of the implanted paraplegic rats showed a markedly improved ability to support weight on their hind limbs and walk. 75% of the treated rats also responded to gross stimuli to the hind limbs and tail.

In contrast, control paraplegic rats that did not receive showed no improved mobility or sensory responses.

In addition, the lesions in the spinal cords of the treated rats subsided to some extent. This indicates that their spinal cords were healing.

Source: https://medicalxpress.com/

Lenses Provide Nano Scale X-ray Microscopy

Scientists at DESY (Germany) have developed novel lenses that enable X-ray microscopy with record resolution in the nanometre regime. Using new materials, the research team led by DESY scientist Saša Bajt from the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has perfected the design of specialised X-ray optics and achieved a focus spot size with a diameter of less than ten nanometres. A nanometre is a millionths of a millimetre and is smaller than most virus particles. They successfully used their lenses to image samples of marine plankton.

Modern particle accelerators provide ultra-bright and high-quality X-ray beams. The short wavelength and the penetrating nature of X-rays are ideal for the microscopic investigation of complex materials. However, taking full advantage of these properties requires highly efficient and almost perfect optics in the X-ray regime. Despite extensive efforts worldwide this turned out to be more difficult than expected, and achieving an X-ray microscope that can resolve features smaller than 10 nm is still a big challenge.

 

The silica shell of the diatom Actinoptychus senarius, measuring only 0.1 mm across, is revealed in fine detail in this X-ray hologram recorded at 5000-fold magnification with the new lenses. The lenses focused an X-ray beam to a spot of approximately eight nanometres diameter – smaller than a single virus – which then expanded to illuminate the diatom and form the hologram

The new lenses consist of over 10 000 alternating layers of a new material combination, tungsten carbide and silicon carbide. “The selection of the right material pair was critical for the success,” emphasises Bajt. “It does not exclude other material combinations but it is definitely the best we know now.” The resolution of the new lenses is about five times better than achievable with typical state-of-the-art lenses.

We produced the world’s smallest X-ray focus using high efficiency lenses,” says Bajt. The new lenses have an efficiency of more than 80 per cent. This high efficiency is achieved with the layered structures that make up the lens and which act like an artificial crystal to diffract X-rays in a controlled way.

The researchers have reported their work in the journal Light: Science and Applications.

Source: http://www.desy.de/

3D-Printed Plastic Objects Connect To The Internet Without Any Electronics

Researchers from the University of Washington (UW) have developed 3D-printed plastic objects that can connect to the internet without any electronics or batteries. The researchers found a way to 3D-print plastic objects that can absorb or reflect ambient WiFi signals and send data wirelessly to any WiFi receiver like a smartphone or router.

Possible use cases include an attachment for laundry detergent that can sense when soap is running low, or a water sensor that notifies your smartphone when there is a leak.

As the UW explains in its news release, the researchers “replaced some functions normally performed by electrical components with mechanical motion activated by springs, gears, switches and other parts that can be 3-D printed — borrowing from principles that allow battery-free watches to keep time.” The scientists found that those mechanical motions can trigger gears and springs that connect to an antenna, all within the object.
The team opens new approach: “Can objects made of plastic materials be connected to smartphones and other Wi-Fi devices, without the need for batteries or electronics? A positive answer would enable a rich ecosystem of ‘talking objects3D printed with commodity plastic filaments that have the ability to sense and interact with their surroundings. Imagine plastic sliders or knobs that can enable rich physical interaction by dynamically sending information to a nearby Wi-Fi receiver to control music volume and lights in a room. This can also transform inventory management where for instance a plastic detergent bottle can self-monitor usage and re-order supplies via a nearby Wi-Fi device.
Such a capability democratizes the vision of ubiquitous connectivity by enabling designers to download and use our computational modules, without requiring the engineering expertise to integrate radio chips and other electronics in their physical creations. Further, as the commoditization of 3D printers continues, such a communication capability opens up the potential for individuals to print highly customized wireless sensors, widgets and objects that are tailored to their individual needs and connected to the Internet ecosystem
.”

Source: http://printedwifi.cs.washington.edu/
https://www.geekwire.com/

How To Remove Air Pollution Inside Cars

You might think sitting in your car with your windows closed keeps you safe from air pollution. The makers of a new pollution-busting filter say you’d be wrong.

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When you’re in your car you’re directly in the lanes of traffic and you’re actually taking air into the car. That’s coming from the exhaust of the cars in front of you. This means that there are greatly elevated levels of air pollution inside of a vehicle. This is both for nitrogen dioxide and for particulate matter“,  says Matthew Johnson,  Professor of Chemistry at the University of Copenhagen (Denmark).

Toxic air pollution passes through air inlets inside cars. Emissions from diesel vehicles are worst. The team from University of Copenhagen and start-up Airlabs has created Airbubbl, which contains two filters.
We have a chemical filter that’s removing nitrogen dioxide and ozone and odour from the air stream. We also have a high performance particle filter that’s removing soot and road dust and brake dust and these other components. We combine that inside this case. This plugs into the cigarette lighter. We have some quiet fans at the two ends of the device and we’ve used computational fluid dynamics in order to direct the airflow towards the passengers,” explains Johnson.
Independent tests in London saw nitrogen dioxide concentrations inside cars fall by 95 percent in 10 minutes. The Airbubbl is lightweight and easily attachable. A Kickstarter campaign has been launched to market the device.

Source: https://www.reuters.com/

Crowdfunding: https://www.kickstarter.com/

Swiss Army Knife NanoVaccine To Fight Tumors

Scientists are using their increasing knowledge of the complex interaction between cancer and the immune system to engineer increasingly potent anti-cancer vaccines.
Now researchers at the National Institute ofBiomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed a synergistic nanovaccine packing DNA and RNA sequences that modulate the immune response, along with anti-tumor antigens, into one smallnanoparticle. The nanovaccine produced an immune response that specifically killed tumor tissue, while simultaneously inhibiting tumor-induced immune suppression. Together this blocked lung tumor growth in a mouse model of metastatic colon cancer.

Large particles (left) containing the DNA and RNA components are coated with electronically charged molecules that shrink the particle. The tumor-specific neoantigen is then complexed with the surface to complete construction of the nanovaccine.
Upper left: electron micrograph of large particle

 

The molecular dance between cancer and the immune system is a complex one and scientists continue to identify the specific molecular pathways that rev up or tamp down the immune system. Biomedical engineers are using this knowledge to create nanoparticles that can carry different molecular agents that target these pathways. The goal is to simultaneously stimulate the immune system to specifically attack the tumor while also inhibiting the suppression of the immune system, which often occurs in cancer patients. The aim is to press on the gas pedal of the immune system while also releasing the emergency brake.

A key hurdle is to design a system to reproducibly and efficiently create a nanoparticle loaded with multiple agents that synergize to mount an enhanced immune attack on the tumor. Engineers at the NIBIB report the development and testing of such a nanovaccine in the journal Nature Communications.

Source: https://www.nibib.nih.gov/

How To Trap DNA molecules With Your Smartphone

Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphenetiny electronictweezers” that can grab biomolecules floating in water with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phoneGraphene, a material made of a single layer of carbon atoms, was discovered more than a decade ago and has enthralled researchers with its range of amazing properties that have found uses in many new applications from microelectronics to solar cells. The graphene tweezers developed at the University of Minnesota are vastly more effective at trapping particles compared to other techniques used in the past due to the fact that graphene is a single atom thick, less than 1 billionth of a meter.

The physical principle of tweezing or trapping nanometer-scale objects, known as dielectrophoresis, has been known for a long time and is typically practiced by using a pair of metal electrodes. From the viewpoint of grabbing molecules, however, metal electrodes are very blunt. They simply lack the “sharpness” to pick up and control nanometer-scale objects.

Graphene is the thinnest material ever discovered, and it is this property that allows us to make these tweezers so efficient. No other material can come close,” said research team leader Sang-Hyun Oh, a Professor at the University of Minnesota. “To build efficient electronic tweezers to grab biomolecules, basically we need to create miniaturized lightning rods and concentrate huge amount of electrical flux on the sharp tip. The edges of graphene are the sharpest lightning rods.

The team also showed that the graphene tweezers could be used for a wide range of physical and biological applications by trapping semiconductor nanocrystals, nanodiamond particles, and even DNA molecules. Normally this type of trapping would require high voltages, restricting it to a laboratory environment, but graphene tweezers can trap small DNA molecules at around 1 Volt, meaning that this could work on portable devices such as mobile phones.

The research study has been published  in Nature Communications.

Source: https://cse.umn.edu/

Copycat Robot

Introducing T-HR3, third generation humanoid robot designed to explore how clever joints can improve brilliant balance and real remote controlToyota says its 29 joints allow it to copy the most complex of moves – safely bringing friendly, helpful robots one step closer.


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Humanoid robots are very popular among Japanese people…creating one like this has always been our dream and that’s why we pursued it,” says Akifumi Tamaoki, manager of Partner robot division at Toyota.

The robot is controlled by a remote operator sitting in an exoskeletonmirroring its master’s moves, a headset giving the operator a realtime robot point of view.

We’re primarily focused on making this robot a very family-oriented one, so that it can help people including services such as carer” explains Tamaoki.
Toyota said T-HR3 could help around the homes or medical facilities in Japan or construction sites, a humanoid helping hand – designed for a population ageing faster than anywhere else on earth.

Source: http://toyota.com/

Artificial Intelligence Chip Analyzes Molecular-level Data In Real Time

Nano Global, an Austin-based molecular data company, today announced that it is developing a chip using intellectual property (IP) from Arm, the world’s leading semiconductor IP company. The technology will help redefine how global health challenges – from superbugs to infectious diseases, and cancer are conquered.

The pioneering system-on-chip (SoC) will yield highly-secure molecular data that can be used in the recognition and analysis of health threats caused by pathogens and other living organisms. Combined with the company’s scientific technology platform, the chip leverages advances in nanotechnology, optics, artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain authentication, and edge computing to access and analyze molecular-level data in real time.

In partnership with Arm, we’re tackling the vast frontier of molecular data to unlock the unlimited potential of this universe,” said Steve Papermaster, Chairman and CEO of Nano Global. “The data our technology can acquire and process will enable us to create a safer and healthier world.”

We believe the technology Nano Global is delivering will be an important step forward in the collective pursuit of care that improves lives through the application of technology,” explained Rene Haas, executive vice president and president of IPG, Arm. “By collaborating with Nano Global, Arm is taking an active role in developing and deploying the technologies that will move us one step closer to solving complex health challenges.”

Additionally, Nano Global will be partnering with several leading institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine and National University of Singapore, on broad research initiatives in clinical, laboratory, and population health environments to accelerate data collection, analysis, and product development.
The initial development of the chip is in process with first delivery expected by 2020. The company is already adding new partners to their platform.

Source: https://nanoglobal.com/
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www.prnewswire.com

Polymeric Materials Outperform Natural Antibodies

Experts from the Biotechnology Group led by Professor Sergey Piletsky at the University of Leicester (UK) in collaboration with the spin-off company MIP Diagnostics Ltd, have announced the development of polymeric materials with molecular recognition capabilities which hold the potential to outperform natural antibodies in various diagnostic applications.

chemical background

 In a newly released article ‘A comparison of the performance of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for small molecule targets and antibodies in the ELISA format’ the researchers successfully demonstrated that polymer nanoparticles produced by the molecular imprinting technique (MIP nanoparticles) can bind to the target molecule with the same or higher affinity and specificity than widely used commercially available antibodies and against challenging targets.

Additionally, their ease of manufacture, short lead time, high affinity and the lack of requirement for cold chain logistics make them an attractive alternative to traditional antibodies for use in immunoassays.

Professor Piletsky, from our Department of Chemistry, explained: “It is now well over twenty years since the first demonstration that molecularly imprinted polymers can be used as the recognition material in assays for clinically significant drugs“. 

Source: https://www2.le.ac.uk/

Tesla Electric Truck Travels 500 Miles (805 km) On A Single Charge

The main course was expected: a pair of sleek silver Tesla semi-trucks that get 500 miles per charge, go from zero to 60 mph in five seconds and — if the hype is to be believed — promise to single-handedly transform the commercial trucking industry. But dessert was a surprise: A bright red prototype of the newest Tesla Roadster, a revamped version of the company’s debut vehicle that can travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco and back on a single charge and go from zero to 60 mph in under two seconds. If true, that would make the $200,000 sports car the fastest production car ever made.

On Thursday night, Tesla chief executive Elon Musk delivered both dishes to a packed crowd at the company’s design studio in Hawthorne, Calif.

What does it feel like to drive this truck?” Musk asked the audience, shortly after his latest creations rolled onto the stage. “It’s amazing! It’s smooth, just like driving a Tesla.” “It’s unlike any truck that you’ve ever driven,” he added, noting that Tesla’s big rig puts the driver at the center of the vehicle like a race car, but surrounded with touchscreen displays like those found in the Model 3. “I can drive this thing and I have no idea how to drive a semi.”

Range anxiety has always been a key concern for anyone who is weighing the purchase of an electric vehicle. Musk sought to reassure potential buyers that the company’s big rigs can match — and surpass — the performance of a diesel engine, which he referred to as “economic suicide.” Musk did not reveal the truck’s exact price, but argued that a diesel truck would be 20 cents more expensive per mile than Tesla’s electric counterpart, which will be available for purchase in 2019.

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/