Articles from November 2017



Begun, the electric hypercar performance war has

  1. Begun, the electric hypercar performance war has  Ars Technica
  2. Tesla’s Big Surprise: New Roadster Super Car  RollingStone.com
  3. Tesla event did not blow all of Wall Street’s minds into an alternate dimension  CNBC
  4. Elon Musk’s 10-Ton Challenge: Turning Tesla Into A Semi Truck Powerhouse  Forbes
  5. Elon Musk’s 1000 hp Tesla Semi truck just became the second most desirable vehicle in the world  Firstpost
  6. Full coverage

Tesla Electric Truck Travels 500 Miles (805 km) On A Single Charge

The main course was expected: a pair of sleek silver Tesla semi-trucks that get 500 miles per charge, go from zero to 60 mph in five seconds and — if the hype is to be believed — promise to single-handedly transform the commercial trucking industry. But dessert was a surprise: A bright red prototype of the newest Tesla Roadster, a revamped version of the company’s debut vehicle that can travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco and back on a single charge and go from zero to 60 mph in under two seconds. If true, that would make the $200,000 sports car the fastest production car ever made.

On Thursday night, Tesla chief executive Elon Musk delivered both dishes to a packed crowd at the company’s design studio in Hawthorne, Calif.

What does it feel like to drive this truck?” Musk asked the audience, shortly after his latest creations rolled onto the stage. “It’s amazing! It’s smooth, just like driving a Tesla.” “It’s unlike any truck that you’ve ever driven,” he added, noting that Tesla’s big rig puts the driver at the center of the vehicle like a race car, but surrounded with touchscreen displays like those found in the Model 3. “I can drive this thing and I have no idea how to drive a semi.”

Range anxiety has always been a key concern for anyone who is weighing the purchase of an electric vehicle. Musk sought to reassure potential buyers that the company’s big rigs can match — and surpass — the performance of a diesel engine, which he referred to as “economic suicide.” Musk did not reveal the truck’s exact price, but argued that a diesel truck would be 20 cents more expensive per mile than Tesla’s electric counterpart, which will be available for purchase in 2019.

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/

Pre-orders for Tesla’s Truck Are The Most Important Number To Investors Tonight

  1. Pre-orders for Tesla’s Truck Are The Most Important Number To Investors Tonight  Forbes
  2. How to watch tonight’s Tesla semi truck unveiling  The Verge
  3. The relationship history of Elon Musk, who says he must be in love to be happy  The Independent
  4. Full coverage

Breathing in Delhi air equivalent to smoking 44 cigarettes a day

It was early on the morning when residents in the Indian capital of Delhi first began to notice the thick white haze that had descended across the city. Initially viewed as a mild irritant, by mid-week its debilitating effects were evident to all, as the city struggled to adapt to the new eerie, martian-like conditions brought about by the pollution.

The World Health Organization considers anything above 25 to be unsafe. That measure is based on the concentration of fine particulate matter, or PM2.5, per cubic meter. The microscopic particles, which are smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, are considered particularly harmful because they are small enough to lodge deep into the lungs and pass into other organs, causing serious health risks.
With visibility severely reduced, trains have been canceled, planes delayed and cars have piled into each other, with multiple traffic accidents reported across the city. On the afternoon, city chiefs closed all public and private schools, requesting instead that the city’s tens of thousands of school-aged children remain indoors; they banned incoming trucks and halted civil construction projects; while they announced new plans to begin implementing a partial ban on private car use as of next week. But as the city woke up to a fourth straight day of heavy pollution, practical considerations were being overtaken by more serious concerns, with journalists and doctors warning residents of the long-term health implications.

Air quality readings in the Indian capital have reached frightening levels in recent days, at one point topping the 1,000 mark on the US embassy air quality index. Across the capital, doctors reported a surge in patients complaining of chest pain, breathlessness and burning eyes. “The number of patients have increased obviously,” said Deepak Rosha, a pulmonologist at Apollo Hospital, one of the largest private hospitals in Delhi. “I don’t think it’s ever been so bad in Delhi. I’m very angry that we’ve had to come to this.”
Breathing in air with a PM2.5 content of between 950 to 1,000 is considered roughly equivalent to smoking 44 cigarettes a day, according to the independent Berkeley Earth science research group.

Photovoltaics: Light Absorption Enhanced by Up to 200 Percent

Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany, have now succeeded in transferring these nanostructures to solar cells and, thus, enhancing their light absorption rate by up to 200 percent.

 “The butterfly studied by us is very dark black. This signifies that it perfectly absorbs sunlight for optimum heat management. Even more fascinating than its appearance are the mechanisms that help reaching the high absorption. The optimization potential when transferring these structures to photovoltaics (PV) systems was found to be much higher than expected,” says Dr. Hendrik Hölscher of KIT’s Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT).

 

The scientists of the team of Hendrik Hölscher and Radwanul H. Siddique (formerly KIT, now Caltech) reproduced the butterfly’s nanostructures in the silicon absorbing layer of a thin-film solar cell. Subsequent analysis of light absorption yielded promising results: Compared to a smooth surface, the absorption rate of perpendicular incident light increases by 97% and rises continuously until it reaches 207% at an angle of incidence of 50 degrees. “This is particularly interesting under European conditions. Frequently, we have diffuse light that hardly falls on solar cells at a vertical angle,” Hendrik Hölscher says. However, this does not automatically imply that efficiency of the complete PV system is enhanced by the same factor, says Guillaume Gomard of IMT. “Also other components play a role. Hence, the 200 percent are to be considered a theoretical limit for efficiency enhancement.

The scientists have reported their results in the journal Science Advances. (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700232.)

Source: http://www.kit.edu/

Microsoft gets data-fabulous at NYC event

  1. Microsoft gets data-fabulous at NYC event  ZDNet
  2. MariaDB coming to Azure, as Microsoft joins the MariaDB Foundation  Ars Technica
  3. Azure IoT Edge brings smarts to devices at the cloud’s edge  InfoWorld
  4. Full coverage

How To Correct Genes That Cause High Cholesterol

U.S. researchers have used nanotechnology plus the powerful CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing tool to turn off a key cholesterol-related gene in mouse liver cells, an advance that could lead to new ways to correct genes that cause high cholesterol and other liver diseasesNanotechnology is the design and manipulation of materials thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair.

We’ve shown you can make a nanoparticle that can be used to permanently and specifically edit the DNA in the liver of an adult animal,” said study author Daniel Anderson, an associate professor in chemical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The study, published  in Nature Biotechnology, holds promise for permanently editing genes such as PCSK9, a cholesterol-regulating gene that is already the target of two drugs made by the biotechnology companies Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Amgen.

In the study, the scientists were trying to develop a safe and efficient way to deliver the components needed for CRISPR-Cas9, a type of molecular scissors that can selectively trim away defective genes and replace them with new stretches of DNA.

The system consists of a DNA-cutting enzyme called Cas9 and a stretch of RNA that guides the cutting enzyme to the correct spot in the genome. Most teams currently use viruses to deliver CRISPR into cells, an approach that is limited because the immune system can develop antibodies to viruses.

To overcome this, the team chemically modified the CRISPR components to protect them from enzymes in the body that would normally break them down. They then inserted this material into nano-scale fat particles and injected them into mice, where they made their way to liver cells.

In tests targeting the PCSK9 gene, the system proved highly effective, . The PCSK9 protein made by this gene was undetectable in the treated mice, eliminating the gene in more than 80 percent of liver cells, which also experienced a 35 percent drop in total cholesterol, the researchers reported.

High levels of cholesterol can clog arteries, causing reduced blood flow that can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

Source: http://news.mit.edu/

Next year’s three iPhones could all look like the iPhone X

  1. Next year’s three iPhones could all look like the iPhone X  CNET
  2. The mythical ‘iPhone killer’ finally exists  BGR
  3. Apple could launch two new full-screen iPhones next year  The Verge
  4. Next year’s iPhones: More X? More notch? Here are our predictions  ZDNet
  5. KGI: Apple to Launch 6.5-Inch ‘iPhone X Plus’ and Lower-Priced 6.1-Inch Full-Screen LCD Model Next Year  Mac Rumors
  6. Full coverage

AI, “worst event in the history of our civilisation” says Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking has sent a stark warning out to the world, stating that the invention of artificial intelligence (AI) could be the “worst event in the history of our civilisation”. Speaking at the Web Summit technology conference in Lisbon, Portugal, the theoretical physicist reiterated his warning against the rise of powerful, conscious machines.
While Prof Hawking admitted that AI could be used for good, he also stated that humans need to find a way to control it so that it does not become more powerful than us as “computers can, in theory, emulate human intelligence, and exceed it.” Looking at the positives, the 75-year old said AI could help undo some of the damage that humans have inflicted on the natural world, help beat disease and “transform” every aspect of society. But, there are negatives that come with it.
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Success in creating effective AI, could be the biggest event in the history of our civilisation. Or the worst. We just don’t know. “So we cannot know if we will be infinitely helped by AI, or ignored by it and side-lined, or conceivably destroyed by it. “Unless we learn how to prepare for, and avoid, the potential risks, AI could be the worst event in the history of our civilisation. It brings dangers, like powerful autonomous weapons, or new ways for the few to oppress the many. It could bring great disruption to our economy,” explains the University of Cambridge alumni.

Prof Hawking added that to make sure AI is in line with our goals, creators need to “employ best practice and effective management.” But he still has hope: “I am an optimist and I believe that we can create AI for the good of the world. “That it can work in harmony with us. We simply need to be aware of the dangers, identify them, employ the best possible practice and management, and prepare for its consequences well in advance.”

Just last week, Prof Hawking warned that AI will replace us as the dominant being on the planet.

Source: http://www.express.co.uk/

New Genetic And Stem-Cell Technology To Grow Sheets Of Skin

Somewhere in Germany’s Ruhr valley, a nine-year-old boy is doing what children do: playing football, joking around with friends and going to school. Two years ago, he was confined to a hospital bed, dying of a rare and cruel genetic skin disease. The boy had junctional epidermolysis bullosa, or JEB. He, like other people with the disease, carried a mutation in a gene that controls the integrity of the skin. Doctors could only try to ease his suffering as some 80% of his skin simply fell away.

A team of Italian researchers came to his aid by combining stem-cell techniques with gene therapy. As a young scientist at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts, in the 1980s, Michele De Luca — the lead author of the new study — watched pioneers in skin regeneration learn to grow small sheets of skin from cells taken from burns patients, and to use them in grafts. He extended the work in Italy, applying new genetic and stem-cell technologies. He developed ways to generate stem cells from human skin, replace disease-causing genes in them and grow sheets of healthy skin on scaffolds in the lab.

He chose JEB for his first clinical trial, which he registered with the Italian Medicines Agency in 2002. Four years later, he reported his first success, in which he created healthy skin patches from biopsies to replace small areas of sloughed-off skin on the legs of a patient with a form of JEB (F. Mavilio et al. Nature Med. 12, 1397–1402; 2006). New European Commission regulations introduced in 2007 required him to pause the project while he created facilities adhering to ‘good manufacturing practices’ (GMPs) and a spin-off company to meet the demands for strengthened oversight of cell-based therapies.

Having a company refocused his team’s attention on a different type of stem-cell therapy, one likely to yield a product for the market faster. Holoclar, a treatment that replaces the eye’s cornea in a form of blindness, became the world’s first commercial stem-cell therapy in 2015.

A few months later, at the University of Modena, De Luca got a call out of the blue from doctors in Germany who were trying to treat the little boy. Because the therapy had been in a clinical trial, albeit one on hold at the time, and because De Luca could provide GMP services, German regulatory authorities quickly approved the one-off compassionate use of the JEB therapy. Surgeons in Germany sent a skin biopsy to Modena, and two major skin transplants followed. Six months after the initial biopsy, the boy returned to school. During the many months since, he has not had so much as a blister, and loves to show off his ‘new skin’. By their nature, highly personalized treatments using gene therapies and products derived from an individual’s stem cells are likely to be applicable to only a subset of patients.

Scientists and clinicians have presented the details of the recovery in Nature (T. Hirsch et al.Nature http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature24487; 2017). This major clinical development was based on decades of basic research. The clinical data gathered during 21 months of follow-up after the boy’s treatment have also led to major insights into human skin biology, as discussed in an accompanying News & Views (M. Aragona and C. Blanpain Naturehttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature24753; 2017). For example, normal regeneration of the epidermis is directed by only a few stem-cell clones that can self-renew.

Source: http://www.nature.com/

Sophia The Robot Says: ‘I have feelings too’

Until recently, the most famous thing that Sophia the robot had ever done was beat Jimmy Fallon a little too easily in a nationally televised game of rock-paper-scissors.

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But now, the advanced artificial intelligence robot — which looks like Audrey Hepburn, mimics human expressions and may be the grandmother of robots that solve the world’s most complex problems — has a new feather in her cap:

Citizenship.

The kingdom of Saudi Arabia officially granted citizenship to the humanoid robot last week during a program at the Future Investment Initiative, a summit that links deep-pocketed Saudis with inventors hoping to shape the future.

Sophia’s recognition made international headlines — and sparked an outcry against a country with a shoddy human rights record that has been accused of making women second-class citizens.

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/

Smart Paper Conducts Electricity, Detects Water

In cities and large-scale manufacturing plants, a water leak in a complicated network of pipes can take tremendous time and effort to detect, as technicians must disassemble many pieces to locate the problem. The American Water Works Association indicates that nearly a quarter-million water line breaks occur each year in the U.S., costing public water utilities about $2.8 billion annually.

A University of Washington (UW) team wants to simplify the process for discovering detrimental leaks by developing “smartpaper that can sense the presence of water. The paper, laced with conductive nanomaterials, can be employed as a switch, turning on or off an LED light or an alarm system indicating the absence or presence of water.

Water sensing is very challenging to do due to the polar nature of water, and what is used now is very expensive and not practical to implement,” said lead author Anthony Dichiara, a UW assistant professor of bioresource science and engineering in the School of Environment and Forest Sciences. “That led to the reason to pursue this work.”

Along with Dichiara, a team of UW undergraduate students in the Bioresource Science and Engineering program successfully embedded nanomaterials in paper that can conduct electricity and sense the presence of water. Starting with pulp, they manipulated the wood fibers and carefully mixed in nanomaterials using a standard process for papermaking, but never before used to make sensing papers.

Discovering that the paper could detect the presence of water came by way of a fortuitous accident. Water droplets fell onto the conductive paper the team had created, causing the LED light indicating conductivity to turn off. Though at first they thought they had ruined the paper, the researchers realized they had instead created a paper that was sensitive to water.
The researchers described their discovery in a paper appearing in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

Source: http://www.washington.edu/