China, Global Leader In NanoScience

Mobile phones, computers, cosmetics, bicyclesnanoscience is hiding in so many everyday items, wielding a huge influence on our lives at a microscale level. Scientists and engineers from around the world exchanged new findings and perceptions on nanotechnology at the recent 7th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology (ChinaNANO 2017) in Beijing last week. China has become a nanotechnology powerhouse, according to a report released at the conference. China’s applied nanoscience research and the industrialization of nanotechnology have been developing steadily, with the number of nano-related patent applications ranking among the top in the world.

According to Bai Chunli, president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China faces new opportunities for nanoscience research and development as it builds the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology  (NCNST) and globally influential national science centers.

We will strengthen the strategic landscape and top-down design for developing nanoscience, which will contribute greatly to the country’s economy and society,” said Bai.

Nanoscience can be defined as the study of the interaction, composition, properties and manufacturing methods of materials at a nanometer scale. At such tiny scales, the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials are different from those at larger scales — often profoundly so.

For example, alloys that are weak or brittle become strong and ductile; compounds that are chemically inert become powerful catalysts. It is estimated that there are more than 1,600 nanotechnology-based consumer products on the market, including lightweight but sturdy tennis rackets, bicycles, suitcases, automobile parts and rechargeable batteries. Nanomaterials are used in hairdryers or straighteners to make them lighter and more durable. The secret of how sunscreens protect skin from sunburn lies in the nanometer-scale titanium dioxide or zinc oxide they contain.

In 2016, the world’s first one-nanometer transistor was created. It was made from carbon nanotubes and molybdenum disulphide, rather than silicon.
Carbon nanotubes or silver nanowires enable touch screens on computers and televisions to be flexible, said Zhu Xing, chief scientist (CNST). Nanotechnology is also having an increasing impact on healthcare, with progress in drug delivery, biomaterials, imaging, diagnostics, active implants and other therapeutic applications. The biggest current concern is the health threats of nanoparticles, which can easily enter body via airways or skin. Construction workers exposed to nanopollutants face increased health risks.

The report was co-produced by Springer Nature, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) and the National Science Library of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/

NanoTechnology Intellectual Property Worth $81 Million Stolen

Judicial authorities from Taiwan said that they have charged five men who allegedly stole intellectual property from a Tainan nanotechnology company and set up competing nanotechnology plants in China with breaching the Trade Secrets Act (營業秘密法). The Second Special Police Corp, under the National Police Agency, announced details of the investigation yesterday, saying it is the first investigation and prosecution under the act since it was implemented in 2013.

Police said that they detained three former Hsin Fang Nano Technology Co (新芳奈米科技) employees, including a former plant manager surnamed Chen (陳) and a production section chief surnamed Yu (尤), along with two other business associates.

theft

The estimated financial loss to our company is about NT$2.6 billion [US$81.08 million]. We urge the government to crack down on intellectual property theft against Taiwanese businesses,” chairman Chang Jen-hung (張仁鴻) said.

Hsin Fang is a grinding mill machine manufacturer, which are used to produce ultra-fine nanopowders for use in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, consumer electronics, health food, anti-radiation coating, military weapons and in other industrial applications.

Company officials said their nanopowder grinding mill, which incorporates an innovative “dry cryo-nanonization grinding system,” received a top award at a nanotechnology exhibition in Tokyo in 2012, and honors at other industry fairs in Taiwan and other countries. The investigation in 2014 followed reports that Chen, Yu and other former employees, backed by business associates, started a new company in Yunlin CountyUnicat Nano Advanced Materials & Devices Technology Co (環美凱特). Unicat Nano later moved to Chongqing, China, setting up nanotechnology businesses that, according to investigators, were based on intellectual property stolen from Hsin Fang by Chen, Yu and other former employees.

Source: http://www.taipeitimes.com/

China: A Cheap And Frugal Electric Car

Renault-Nissan will develop an affordable electric car for China because the alliance’s current offering, the Nissan Leaf, is too expensive for the local market. Nissan sold just 1,273 units of the Venucia e30, a local version of the Leaf, in China last year, according to the China Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM). The car starts at 242,800 yuan ($36,900).

Venucia-Viwa-500x283I am unhappy with Venucia sales. We envisaged much more than that. We know price is a handicap,” said Carlos Ghosn, Chief Excecutive Officer of Renault-Nissan. “For me the solution will be a very cheap electric car,” Ghosn told journalists at the opening of Renault’s plant here in central China.. Ghosn did not comment on possible sales in markets outside China such as Europe or the size of the car.

China’s market for cars termed ‘new energy vehicles‘ — pure EVs and plug-in hybrids — has rapidly expanded in the last few years to reach 379,000 in 2015, according to government figures quoted by the China Daily newspaper. Ghosn said that despite the incentives, most sales were very cheap electric vehicles made by local brands costing between 30,00050,000 yuan ($4,600$7,000). The biggest selling electric car last year was the tiny Kandi EV city car with 16,736 sold, according to CAAM.

The government is saying we want more electric cars. The public is saying ‘yes, but we want them cheap‘, Ghosn said. He added Renault-Nissan would start development of an affordable electric car but the automakers first had to define what the public would accept. “We need to work out what are the best compromises between acceptable performance and lowest price possible“.

Source: http://europe.autonews.com/

USA, Russia, China Lead The Nanotechnology Race

It is this breadth of nanotechnology’s potential that makes it vital to America’s future competitiveness. Congressman Lamar Smith, chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, believes that American dominance in the field has enormous economic potential and the ability to create new jobs: “it’s a game-changer that could transform and improve Americans’ daily lives in ways we can’t foresee,” he says. On any measure — patents, private and government-sector investment, academic activity — America has so far been a leader in nanotechnology research and, to a lesser extent, development. Federal funding has helped. From 2000-2013 Congress appropriated some $US18 billion for nanotechnology R&D (although the $US1.7 billion budgeted for 2014 is 8% lower than two years ago). Numbers for private-sector investment are harder to come by, but estimates by Lux Research, a firm of analysts, suggest that by 2010, America’s private sector was investing at least $US3.5 billion a year in nanotechnology-related ventures — far more than its closest global competitors.
So why is the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO), an independent agency that works for Congress and scrutinises how the federal government spends taxpayer dollars, now fretting that America may lose the nanotechnology race? In a new report on nanotechnology manufacturing (or nanomanufacturing) released today and prepared for Congressman Smith’s committee, the GAO finds flaws in America’s approach to many things nano.
The main concern is “the missing middle”. Government, universities and start-ups focus their investment on basic research, proofs of concepts and production at laboratory scale. But to win the global nanotechnology race, says the GAO, America must bridge the gap between such activities and being able to produce the technologies at scale.
RusnanoThe GAO’s experts chide the government for lacking a “grand strategy” and to fall behind China and Russia in annual spending on nanotechnology. Russia in particular, is taking advantage of America’s missing-middle mortality rate. Rusnano, a government-owned fund, is picking up the intellectual property of failed American nanotechnology firms

(The GAO report also comes hot on the heels of a National Science Board study showing that China’s global share of overall high-tech manufacturing rose from 8% to 24% from 2003-2012, close to America’s 27%.)
Source: http://www.businessinsider.com.au/

Graphene: Massive Production Plant Opens In China

In July the Chinese company Ningbo Morsh Technology has establised a new graphene production line that will have an annual capacity of 300 tons (or tens of millions of graphene films). The line was supposed to be operational by August 2013, and now there are reports from China that finally production began. Graphene can be described as a one-atom thick layer of graphite. It is the basic structural element of other allotropes, including graphite, charcoal, carbon nanotubes and fullerene. It is considered as the “wonder material“, a key element for the future of all industries.
graphene2014
The report further says that China plans to build a state-level graphene industrialization base in China’s Chongqing Municipality (city of 35 millions inhabitants). Within 5 years, they hope to reach revenues of 100 billion yuan ($16.35 billion). If the capacity is indeed 300 tons per year, then China is now the world’s leading graphene producer by far.
Investment in Ningo Morsh‘s production line exceeded 100 million yuan ($16 million). Ningbo Morsh Technology are supplying graphene to Chongqing Morsh Technology, who’s building a production line in Chongqing that will be used to produce 15″ single-layer graphene films that will be used to produce graphene transparent touch panel conductive films. Chongqing Morsh original plan was to start production by March 2014 and they already signed an agreement with Guangdong Zhengyang, an OGS maker to produce 10 million graphene based transparent conducting films (TCFs) in a year for the next five years.

Ningbo Morsh Technology was established by Shanghai Nanjiang in 2012 in Ningo, Zhejiang. They use technology developed at the Chongqing Institute which was licensed to Shanghai Nanjiang..
Source: http://www.morsh.cn/#
AND
http://www.graphene-info.com/

Gene Therapy For Cardiac Repair

Researchers have established a novel gene therapy strategy which is an excellent substitute for the current expensive and uncontrollable Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene delivery system. The discovery of the hyperbranched poly(amidoamine) (hPAMAM) nanoparticle based hypoxia regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (HRE-VEGF) gene therapy strategy, by Dr Changfa Guo, Professor Chunsheng Wang and their co-investigators from Zhongshan hospital Fudan University, Shanghai, China, provides an economical, feasible and biocompatible gene therapy strategy for cardiac repair.

 

Transplantation of VEGF gene manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been proposed as a promising therapeutic method for cardiac repair after myocardium infarction. However, the gene delivery system, including the VEGF gene and delivery vehicle, needs to be optimized. 

Zhongshan hospital Fudan University, Shanghai:
 
 http://www.zs-hospital.sh.cn/e/intro/index.htm

Source: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/228062762_Novel_vascular
_endothelial_growth_factor_gene_delivery_system-anipulated_mesenchymal_stem_cells_repair_infarcted_myocardium

Spy arrested for sharing US nanotechnology research with China

The US federal government says a former scientist,  Jianyu Huang, stole research at the highly  strategic Sandia National Labs in New Mexico to share it with China.  Jianyu Huang will be arraigned Tuesday on five counts of federal program fraud and one count of making false statements. He was arrested over the weekend.

Authorities say Huang passed off nanotechnology research that belongs to the U.S. as his own. They say he went online to share the data with state-run schools in China. Huang is also accused of lying about taking a lab-owned laptop computer there. Sandia Lab says Huang was fired in April for violating procedures and that he never had access to classified national security information. A message left for Huang’s public defender, Brian Pori, was not immediately returned.

Source: http://www.sandia.gov/
http://www.krqe.com/dpp/news/crime/sandia-national-labs-scientist-indicted