3D Printed Concrete Bridge

Today world’s first 3D printed reinforced, pre-stressed concrete bridge was opened. The cycle bridge is part of a new road around the village of Gemert, in the Netherlands. It was printed at Eindhoven University of Technology. With the knowledge the researchers gained in this project, they are now able to design even larger printed concrete structures.
The bridge is the first civil infrastructure project to be realized with 3D-concrete printing. The bridge is 8 meters long (clear span 6.5 meters) and 3.5 meters wide. As it is a ‘worlds first’, the developers did not take any chances and tested the bridge by putting a load of 5 tons on it, which is a lot more than the load the bridge will actually carry.

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The bridge has to meet all regular requirements of course. It is designed to do its duty – to carry cyclists – for thirty years or more. With more cycles than people in the Netherlands, it is expected that hundreds of cyclists will ride over the printed bridge every day. It is part of a large road construction project, led by the company BAM Infra, and commissioned by the province of North-Brabant.
An important detail is that the researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have succeeded in developing a process to incorporate steel reinforcement cable while laying a strip of concrete. The steel cable is the equivalent of the reinforcement mesh used in conventional concrete. It handles the tensile stress because concrete cannot deal with tensile stress adequately, but steel can.
One of the main advantages of printing concrete is that much less concrete is needed than in the conventional technique, in which a mold (formwork) is filled with concrete. By contrast, the printer deposits only the concrete where it is needed, which decreases the use of cement. This reduces CO2 emissions, as cement production has a very high carbon footprint.

Another benefit lies in the freedom of form: the printer can make any desired shape, whereas conventional concrete shapes tend to be unwieldy in shape due to use of formwork. Concrete printing also enables a much higher realization speed. No formwork structures have to be built and dismantled, and reinforcement mesh does not have to be put in place separately. Overall, the researchers think the realization will eventually be roughly three times faster than conventional concrete techniques.

Source: https://www.tue.nl/

New WIFI Speeds Up To 300 Times Faster

Researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands) say their new wireless network that uses harmless infrared rays will make wifi speeds up to 300 times faster.


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“What we are doing actually is using rays of light which convey the information in a wireless way, and each ray is acting as a very high capacity channel. It’s actually the same as an optical fibre without needing the fibre, and what we achieved up to this moment is 112 gigabits per second,” says Professor Ton Koonen, Eindhoven University of Technology.

That’s the equivalent data of three full-length movies being downloaded per second. Light antennas radiate multiple invisible wavelengths at various angles. If a user’s smartphone or tablet moves out of one antenna’s sightline, another takes over. Infrared wavelengths don’t go into your eyes, making them safe to use. The lack of moving parts makes the system maintenance and power-free. While each user gets their own antenna.

The big benefits we see of our technique is that you offer unshared capacity to each individual user, so you get a guaranteed capacity. Next to that you only get a beam if you need the traffic. So we’re not illuminating the whole place where maybe a single user is there. That means it’s much more power efficient. Another efficiency, another advantage, is that light doesn’t go through walls. So that means your communication is really confined to the particular room. Nobody can listen in from outside, so it offers you a lot of security,” explains rofessor Ton Koonen.
The team is seeking funding to help make the technology widespread within five years.

Source: http://www.reuters.com/

Hydrogen-based Electric Bus

FAST, a student team from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in Netherlands, has designed the world’s first system that allows a bus to drive on formic acid. Their self-built system comprises an electric bus that is hooked up to a small trailer – which the students have christened ‘REX’ – in which formic acid is converted into electricity. The benefits of using formic acid are that it is sustainable, CO2-neutral, safe and liquid.

 

Hydrozine is the energy carrier’s official name. It’s 99% formic acid with a performance enhancing agent. What is striking is that Team FAST, consisting of 35 students, developed this so far unknown fuel all by itself. At the beginning of 2016 they presented an initial scale model that illustrated how it works. After another twenty months of hard work, they now have a system that is 42,000 times stronger and is capable of 25kW power.

In the trailer that was built by the team hydrozine is split into hydrogen and CO2. The hydrogen is then used to produce electricity that powers a city bus of the Eindhoven company VDL. The team calls the trailer a ‘range extender’, REX for short, because the trailer expands the existing range of the bus as a standalone component. The team is still running final tests with the aim of the bus actually operating by the end of this year.

The benefits of hydrozine are many. It is a cheap and safe alternative to the transport of hydrogen that normally requires large tanks and high pressure. The CO2 produced in splitting the hydrozine is also used in the production process, which results in zero net CO2. Hydrozine has four times as much energy density as a battery and since it is a liquid, very few modifications will be required to the current infrastructure of filling stations.

Source: https://www.tue.nl/

Nano-LED 1000 Times More Efficient

The electronic data connections within and between microchips are increasingly becoming a bottleneck in the exponential growth of data traffic worldwide. Optical connections are the obvious successors but optical data transmission requires an adequate nanoscale light source, and this has been lacking. Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) now have created a light source that has the right characteristics: a nano-LED that is 1000 times more efficient than its predecessors, and is capable of handling gigabits per second data speeds.

NANO LEDWith electrical cables reaching their limits, optical connections like fiberglass are increasingly becoming the standard for data traffic. Over longer distances almost all data transmission is optical. Within computer systems and microchips, too, the growth of data traffic is exponential, but that traffic is still electronic, and this is increasingly becoming a bottleneck. Since these connections (‘interconnects’) account for the majority of the energy consumed by chips, many scientists around the world are working on enabling optical (photonic) interconnects. Crucial to this is the light source that converts the data into light signals which must be small enough to fit into the microscopic structures of microchips. At the same time, the output capacity and efficiency have to be good. Especially the efficiency is a challenge, as small light sources, powered by nano– or microwatts, have always performed very inefficiently to date.
The researchers in Eindhoven believe that their nano-LED is a viable solution that will take the brake off the growth of data traffic on chips. However, they are cautious about the prospects. The development is not yet at the stage where it can be exploited by the industry and the production technology that is needed still has to get off the ground.
The findings are reported in the online journal Nature Communications.

Source: https://www.tue.nl/

Electric Motorbike Round-The-World Trip

80-day round-the-world trips aren’t new – but using an electric motorbike built from scratch by students on them certainly is. Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands) riders drove up to 500 kilometres a day on their self-constructed Storm Wave bike, relying entirely on battery power. Other students rode behind in a bus, with one change of driver and battery swap per day.

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With a full pack you can ride 400 kilometres on one single charge. But during our tour we had to drive more, so we had to re-energise quickly. So we just took the empty ones out, replaced them with charged ones, and we could ride again,” says Bas Verkaik, Spokeperson for Storm Eindhoven.  Key to the Storm Wave is its unique modular system of 24 individual batteries. This helped ease navigation of difficult roads in countries like Turkmenistan and Uzbekhistan.

When we faced those bad roads we just took, for example half of the batteries out, we have a lighter motorcycle, lower centre of gravity, which makes it easier to handle,” comments Bas Verkaik. Storm Wave also contains a gearbox, unusual for an electric motorcycle, but allowing greater acceleration and efficiency at high speeds.

The misconceptions people have about electric vehicles is that either they’re slow or they don’t have enough power or they can’t drive fast or far enough. With our motorcycle it can go from zero to 100 (kilometres per hour) in under five seconds, and probably could go even faster if we changed some specs… I think it looks pretty nice. That’s also a misconception that people have, that electric vehicles have to be futuristic and they don’t like the design, but I’ve only heard good things about this motorcycle” , explains Storm Wave driver Yorick Heidema.

The 23 students returned home in November after receiving huge interest in cities they drove through. They say they’ve showed the world that long-distance electric vehicle travel isn’t just feasible, but cool too.

Source: https://www.storm-eindhoven.com/
AND
http://www.reuters.com/

Paracetamol On Mars

How to produce medicine sustainably and cheaply, anywhere you want, whether in the middle of the jungle or even on Mars? Looking for a ‘mini-factory’ whereby sunlight can be captured to make chemical products? Inspired by the art of nature where leaves are able to collect enough sunlight to produce food, chemical engineers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in Netherlands have presented such a scenario. 
Using sunlight to make chemical products has long been a dream of many a chemical engineer. The problem is that the available sunlight generates too little energy to kick off reactions. However, nature is able to do this. Antenna molecules in leaves capture energy from sunlight and collect it in the reaction centers of the leaf where enough solar energy is present for the chemical reactions that give the plant its food (photosynthesis).

Luminescent Solar Concentrator-based Photomicroreactor (LSC-PM, artificial leaf for organic synthesis), research by PhD Dario Cambie & Timothy Noël, group Micro Flow Chemistry and Process Technology, Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, TU Eindhoven. photo: TU/e, Bart van Overbeeke

Luminescent Solar Concentrator-based Photomicroreactor (LSC-PM, artificial leaf for organic synthesis), research by PhD Dario Cambie & Timothy Noël

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The researchers came across relatively new materials, known as luminescent solar concentrators (LSC’s), which are able to capture sunlight in a similar way. Special light-sensitive molecules in these materials capture a large amount of the incoming light that they then convert into a specific color that is conducted to the edges via light conductivity. These LSC’s are often used in practice in combination with solar cells to boost the yield.

 


The results surpassed all their expectations, and not only in the lab. “Even an experiment on a cloudy day demonstrated that the chemical production was 40 percent higher than in a similar experiment without LSC material”, says research leader Noël. “We still see plenty of possibilities for improvement. We now have a powerful tool at our disposal that enables the sustainable, sunlight-based production of valuable chemical products like drugs or crop protection agents.”

For the production of drugs there is certainly a lot of potential. The chemical reactions for producing drugs currently require toxic chemicals and a lot of energy in the form of fossil fuels. By using visible light the same reactions become sustainable, cheap and, in theory, countless times faster. But Noël believes it should not have to stop there. “Using a reactor like this means you can make drugs anywhere, in principle, whether malaria drugs in the jungle or paracetamol on Mars. All you need is sunlight and this mini-factory.

The findings are described in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

Source: https://www.tue.nl/

Solar Fuel Cell For Hydrogen Electric Car

Why not a solar cell that that produces fuel rather than electricity? Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) (Netherlands) and FOM Foundation today present a very promising prototype of this in the journal Nature Communications. The material gallium phosphide enables their solar cell to produce the clean fuel hydrogen gas from liquid water. Processing the gallium phosphide in the form of very small nanowires is novel and helps to boost the yield by a factor of ten. And does so using ten thousand times less precious material.


hydrogen electric car
The electricity produced by a solar cell can be used to set off chemical reactions. If this generates a fuel, then one speaks of solar fuels – a hugely promising replacement for polluting fuels. One of the possibilities is to split liquid water using the electricity that is generated (electrolysis). Among oxygen, this produces hydrogen gas that can be used as a clean fuel in the chemical industry or combusted in fuel cells – in cars for example – to drive engines.

To connect an existing silicon solar cell to a battery that splits the water may well be an efficient solution now but it is a very expensive one. Many researchers are therefore targeting their search at a semiconductor material that is able to both convert sunlight into an electrical charge and split the water, all in one; a kind of ‘solar fuel cell’. Researchers at TU/e and FOM see their dream candidate in gallium phosphide (GaP), a compound of gallium and phosphide that also serves as the basis for specific colored leds.

GaP
has good electrical properties but the drawback that it cannot easily absorb light when it is a large flat surface as used in GaP solar cells. The researchers have overcome this problem by making a grid of very small GaP nanowires, measuring five hundred nanometers (a millionth of a millimeter) long and ninety nanometers thick. This immediately boosted the yield of hydrogen by a factor of ten to 2.9 percent. A record for GaP cells, even though this is still some way off the fifteen percent achieved by silicon cells coupled to a battery.

According to research leader and TU/e professor Erik Bakkers, it’s not simply about the yield – where there is still a lot of scope for improvement he points out: “For the nanowires we needed ten thousand less precious GaP material than in cells with a flat surface. That makes these kinds of cells potentially a great deal cheaper,” Bakkers says. “In addition, GaP is also able to extract oxygen from the water – so you then actually have a fuel cell in which you can temporarily store your solar energy. In short, for a solar fuels future we cannot ignore gallium phosphide any longer.”

Source: https://www.tue.nl/