Regular Hydrogen Electric Bus Lines Will Open In 2019

Koningshooikt – Van Hool, the independent Belgian bus, coach and industrial vehicle manufacturer has won a contract in Pau, France, to supply 8 Exqui.Cities, known as “tram-buses“, powered by hydrogen. The use of hydrogen buses is not only a first for France it is also a world first for a full BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) system with 18-metre-long articulated tram-buses. This is the first time that hydrogen technology has been integrated as a power source in a tram-bus.

The brand new vehicle is an 18.62 metre-long articulated tram-bus with a 125 passenger capacity and an autonomy of around 300 km. The order of 8 Exqui.Cities will be delivered to the SMTU-PPP (Syndicat Mixte de Transports urbains – Pau Portes des Pyrénées) and the STAP (Société de Transport de l’Agglomération Paloise) in the second half of 2019.

The bus’s power source is an electric hybrid. On the one hand hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (O2) are converted to electricity in the fuel cell using electrolysis in “real time” and, on the other hand, the lithium batteries and electric motors provide additional power wherever and whenever it is needed. The energy that is released when the vehicle’s brakes are applied is also re-used. The use of this technology results in the 0-emission of greenhouse gases or air polluting substances. The vehicle’s only emission is water vapour.

Additional advantages offered by hydrogen buses include their autonomy of over three hundred kilometres and fast re-fuelling (10 minutes). These buses therefore allow bus companies to reach the highest level of operational flexibility and productivity.

Source: http://www.vanhool.be/

Water-powered MotorBike

Ricardo Azevedo was frustrated with the ever increasing price of gas. So he used his skills as a mechanic and took some tips from his son’s chemistry book to build a water powered motorcycle.

hydrogen motobike

I still haven’t developed everything is it capable of, but I did some tests and in certain settings it can go 500 kilometres (310 miles) using one litre of water,” says Azevedo.
An electrical current is fed into a canister of water which breaks the liquid down into hydrogen and oxygen using the process of electrolysis. The hydrogen gas is then used to power the engine. Research into hydrogen combustion power has increased dramatically over the past decade and while the chemical process used to generate energy from water is well understood, its market potential is curbed until a way to safely contain and use the highly flammable hydrogen gas is developed. Azevedo says the environmental benefits of using his water powered bike or other hydrogen energy sources far outweigh the risks involved.  “It does not cause any damage to the environment, on the contrary as it will go on to replace fossil fuels and reduce carbon monoxide emissions,” he adds.
Azevedo is continuing to tinker and improve the efficiency of his bike. He says getting fuel from a river beats stopping at a gas station any day of the week.

Source: http://www.reuters.com/

How To Split Water At Low Cost To Produce Hydrogen

UNSW (Australia) scientists have developed a highly efficient oxygen-producing electrode for splitting water that has the potential to be scaled up for industrial production of clean energy fuel, hydrogen. This breaktrough is important for the future development of hydrogen electric cars (H mobil). The new technology is based on an inexpensive, specially coated foam material that lets the bubbles of oxygen escape quickly. Inefficient and costly oxygen-producing electrodes are one of the major barriers to the widespread commercial production of hydrogen by electrolysis, where the water is split into hydrogen and oxygen using an electrical current.

watersplitting Electrode

Our electrode is the most efficient oxygen-producing electrode in alkaline electrolytes reported to date, to the best of our knowledge,” says Associate Professor Chuan Zhao, of the UNSW School of Chemistry. “It is inexpensive, sturdy and simple to make, and can potentially be scaled up for industrial application of water splitting.”

The research, by Associate Professor Zhao and Dr Xunyu Lu, is published in the journal Nature Communications.

Source: http://www.newsroom.unsw.edu.au/