How To Keep Warm In Extreme Cold Weather

Some of the winter weather gear worn by the US Army was designed 30 years ago. It’s heavy and can cause overheating during exertion, while also not doing a very good job of keeping the extremities from going numb.

 

That’s problematic if soldiers have to operate weapons as soon as they land,” said Paola D’Angelo, a research bioengineer at the US Army’s Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center in Massachusetts. “So we want to pursue this fundamental research to see if we can modify hand wear for that extreme cold weather.”

Scientists are developing smart fabrics that heat up when powered and can capture sweat. The work, which was presented at the 254th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, is based on research from Stanford University in California. A team embedded a network of very fine silver nanowires in cotton, and was able to heat the fabric by applying power to the wires. D’Angelo and her colleagues are working to extend the approach to other fabrics more suitable for military uniforms, including polyester and a cotton/nylon blend. By applying three volts – the output of a typical watch battery – to a one-inch square of fabric, they were able to raise its temperature by almost 40 degrees C. The researchers are also incorporating a layer of hydrogel particles made of polyethylene glycol that will absorb sweat and stop the other layers of the fabric from getting wet.

Once we have optimised the coating, we can start looking at scaling up,” said D’Angelo. The fabric has been tested with up to three washes and still works the same as unwashed fabric for most of the textiles being tested.

Source: http://www.imeche.org/

Glucose Monitoring Strip

A research group from the Center for Nanoparticle Research within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea has developed a convenient and accurate sweat-based glucose monitoring and maintenance device. The research group has furthered its previous study* (Nat. Nanotech. 11, 566, 2016) to enhance the efficiency of the sweat collection and sensing & therapy process. This sweat-based system allows rapid glucose measurement incorporating small and sensitive sensors and also comes in a disposable strip sensor to the convenience of users. This accurate glucose analysis allows to prescribe a multistep and precisely controlled dosage of drug.

sweat monitoring stripOptical camera image of the disposable sweat monitoring strip (left). The disposable sweat analysis strip on human skin with perspiration (middle).The disposable strip-type sensors connected to a zero insertion force AQ50 (ZIF) connector (right).

The previous study reported a wearable graphene-based patch that allows diabetes monitoring and feedback therapy by using human sweat. The device’s pH and temperature monitoring functions enable systematic corrections of sweat glucose measurements.

The conventional treatment protocol causes a huge stress to diabetics since it requires painful and repetitive blood-withdrawal and insulin shots. Patients become reluctant to take the periodic tests and treatments, aggravating the diabetes symptoms and suffer severe diabetic complications. A recent alternative approach, sweat-based monitoring offers a painless blood glucose monitoring method, enabling more convenient control of blood glucose levels. However, many challenges still exist for the practical application of the existing system: tedious blood collection procedure; error-prone, enzyme-based glucose sensing that may lead to overtreatment of drugs, etc.

To address such issues, the research group presented an easy-to-use and multistage module to ensure an accurate glucose monitoring and therapy. To speed up the sweat collection, the researchers redevised the system to work under a small amount of sweat. They used electrochemically active, porous metal electrodes (replacing the graphene materials of the previous study) to enhance the sensitivity of the system. Also the porous structure allows to form strong linkage among enzymes, resulting in increased reliability of the sensors under mechanical friction and deformation.

Source: http://www.ibs.re.kr/

Shirt Repels Liquids, Avoid Stains

Many have dreamed of the day when clothes no longer require washing — or require it far less often than they currently do, at least. With nanotechnology came this reality, though not in any significant way. That could be changing with the introduction of the Silic, a t-shirt that repels liquids and avoids being stained by both liquid substances and sweat.

The shirt is said to be made with hydrophobic nanotechnology, and while such has been achieved in the past, the Silic has one bragging point the others don’t — the substance that gives the clothing its liquid adversion doesn’t disappear if the shirt is washed, meaning the Silic can be tossed in with the rest of the laundry. Beyond that, the folks behind the clothing also say their hydrophobic nanotechnology is not cancerous.
stained T-Shirt
The project is funded through the crowdfundind website Kickstarter, and has already surpassed its funding goal of $20,000 — by a present amount of $112,254 USD. There are 1690 backers at the moment and 33 days to go. $40 is the lowest threshold amount to get one of the shirts, while those who pony up $10 will get a section of the material instead, perhaps good as a bar trick or novelty gift

Source: Kickstarter
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