China, Global Leader In NanoScience

Mobile phones, computers, cosmetics, bicyclesnanoscience is hiding in so many everyday items, wielding a huge influence on our lives at a microscale level. Scientists and engineers from around the world exchanged new findings and perceptions on nanotechnology at the recent 7th International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology (ChinaNANO 2017) in Beijing last week. China has become a nanotechnology powerhouse, according to a report released at the conference. China’s applied nanoscience research and the industrialization of nanotechnology have been developing steadily, with the number of nano-related patent applications ranking among the top in the world.

According to Bai Chunli, president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), China faces new opportunities for nanoscience research and development as it builds the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology  (NCNST) and globally influential national science centers.

We will strengthen the strategic landscape and top-down design for developing nanoscience, which will contribute greatly to the country’s economy and society,” said Bai.

Nanoscience can be defined as the study of the interaction, composition, properties and manufacturing methods of materials at a nanometer scale. At such tiny scales, the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials are different from those at larger scales — often profoundly so.

For example, alloys that are weak or brittle become strong and ductile; compounds that are chemically inert become powerful catalysts. It is estimated that there are more than 1,600 nanotechnology-based consumer products on the market, including lightweight but sturdy tennis rackets, bicycles, suitcases, automobile parts and rechargeable batteries. Nanomaterials are used in hairdryers or straighteners to make them lighter and more durable. The secret of how sunscreens protect skin from sunburn lies in the nanometer-scale titanium dioxide or zinc oxide they contain.

In 2016, the world’s first one-nanometer transistor was created. It was made from carbon nanotubes and molybdenum disulphide, rather than silicon.
Carbon nanotubes or silver nanowires enable touch screens on computers and televisions to be flexible, said Zhu Xing, chief scientist (CNST). Nanotechnology is also having an increasing impact on healthcare, with progress in drug delivery, biomaterials, imaging, diagnostics, active implants and other therapeutic applications. The biggest current concern is the health threats of nanoparticles, which can easily enter body via airways or skin. Construction workers exposed to nanopollutants face increased health risks.

The report was co-produced by Springer Nature, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) and the National Science Library of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/

Color Printer Uses A Colorless Ink

From dot-matrix to 3-D, printing technology has come a long way in 40 years. But all of these technologies have created hues by using dye inks, which can be taxing on the environment. Now a team reports in ACS Nano the development of a colorless, non-toxic ink for use in inkjet printers. Instead of relying on dyes, the team exploits the nanostructure of this ink to create color on a page with inkjet printing.

squirrelThis image of a squirrel was printed in color by controlling the thickness of a colorless ink deposited on a thin film

Current technologies blend dyes — think CMYK or RGB — to print in color. But these substances can harm the environment. Aleksandr V. Yakovlev, Alexandr V. Vinogradov and colleagues at ITMO University (Russia) wanted to develop a nanostructure color printing technology that is “greener” and can be printed on a wide variety of surfaces.

The team found that a colorless titanium dioxide-based colloidal ink was the best suited for the job. It does not require high temperature fixing and can be deposited on many surfaces. The researchers can control the color produced on surfaces by varying the thickness of ink deposition from a normal inkjet printer. Creating a vibrant color red with this method and this very narrow angle of coloring remains a challenge. This method, however, has generated the first reported “green” ink that is both safe for the ecosystem and does not fade from UV exposure, the researchers say.

Source: http://www.acs.org/

Electric Cars: How To Improve Batteries

One big problem faced by electrodes in rechargeable batteries, as they go through repeated cycles of charging and discharging, is that they must expand and shrink during each cycle — sometimes doubling in volume, and then shrinking back. This can lead to repeated shedding and reformation of its “skin” layer that consumes lithium irreversibly, degrading the battery’s performance over time.

Image with 2014 Renault

Image with 2014 Renault

Now a team of researchers at MIT and Tsinghua University in China has found a novel way around that problem: creating an electrode made of nanoparticles with a solid shell, and a “yolk” inside that can change size again and again without affecting the shell. The innovation could drastically improve cycle life, the team says, and provide a dramatic boost in the battery’s capacity and power.

The new findings, which use aluminum as the key material for the lithium-ion battery’s negative electrode, or anode, are reported in the journal Nature Communications, in a paper by MIT professor Ju Li and six others. The use of nanoparticles with an aluminum yolk and a titanium dioxide shell has proven to be “the high-rate champion among high-capacity anodes,” the team reports.

Source: https://newsoffice.mit.edu/

Air-cleansing Poem Eradicates 20 Cars Pollution

Simon, Professor of Poetry at the University of Sheffield, – U.K. -and Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Science Professor Tony Ryan, have collaborated to create a catalytic poem called In Praise of Air printed on material containing a formula invented at the University which is capable of purifying its surroundings. Writing is on the wall for air pollution thanks to air-cleansing poem.
This cheap technology could also be applied to billboards and advertisements alongside congested roads to cut pollution.
PoemIn Praise of Air: Poem displayed on the University’s Alfred Denny Building
This is a fun collaboration between science and the arts to highlight a very serious issue of poor air quality in our towns and cities. “The science behind this is an additive which delivers a real environmental benefit that could actually help cut disease and save lives. “This poem alone will eradicate the nitrogen oxide pollution created by about 20 cars every day,” said Professor Ryan, who came up with the idea of using treated materials to cleanse the air.

He added: “If every banner, flag or advertising poster in the country did this, we’d have much better air quality. It would add less than £100 to the cost of a poster and would turn advertisements into catalysts in more ways than one. The countless thousands of poster sites that are selling us cars beside our roads could be cleaning up emissions at the same time.”

The 10m x 20m piece of material which the poem is printed on is coated with microscopic pollution-eating particles of titanium dioxide which use sunlight and oxygen to react with nitrogen oxide pollutants and purify the air.

Source: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/

Sunblocks Are Toxic For Aquatic Life

The sweet and salty aroma of sunscreen and seawater signals a relaxing trip to the shore. But scientists from the Université Aix-Marseille, France, are now reporting that the idyllic beach vacation comes with an environmental hitch. When certain sunblock ingredients wash off skin and into the sea, they can become toxic to some of the ocean’s tiniest inhabitants, which are the main course for many other marine animals.

sunblock
Antonio Tovar-Sanchez and David Sánchez-Quiles (IMERAUniversité Aix Marseille) point out that other than staying indoors, slathering on sunscreen is currently the best way to protect skin from the sun’s harmful rays. But when sunbathers splash into the ocean to cool off, some of their lotions and creams get rinsed into the water. The problem is that titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles, which are common ingredients in sunblock, can react with ultraviolet light from the sun and form new compounds, such as hydrogen peroxide, that could be toxic. High amounts of hydrogen peroxide can harm phytoplankton, the microscopic algae that feed everything from small fish to shrimp to whales. The scientists wanted to figure out just how serious of an impact beachgoers could be having on life in coastal waters.

To investigate the matter, they hit the beach. They went to Majorca Island’s Palmira beach on the Mediterranean along with about 10,000 beachgoers, a small portion of the more than 200 million tourists that flock to Mediterranean shores every year. Based on lab tests, seawater sampling and tourism data, the researchers concluded that titanium dioxide from sunblock was largely responsible for a dramatic summertime spike in hydrogen peroxide levels in coastal waters — with potentially dangerous consequences for aquatic life.

Source: http://www.acs.org/
AND
http://www.imera.fr/

A Glass Of Milk So White…

The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) revealed a few weeks ago that there are over 1,600 nanotechnology-based products on the market today — and that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lacks the authority to regulate them.Some of these nanotechnological innovations — which refer to particles less than 100 nanometers wide, or approximately 1/800th the diameter of a strand of human hair — are likely harmless, such as embedded silver particles in athletic socks and underwear. According to SmartSilver Anti-Odor Nanotechnology Underwear, the microscopic silver particles are “strongly antibacterial to a wide range of pathogens, absorb sweat, and by killing bacteria help eliminate unpleasant foot odor.”

However, the PEN database also includes 96 nanotechnology-infused items currently stocked on grocery store shelves, and none of these items listed their nanotechnology among their ingredients. Included on the list are Dannon Greek Plain Yogurt, Hershey’s Bliss Dark Chocolate, Kraft’s American Cheese Singles, and Rice Dream Rice Drink, all of which contain nanoparticles of titanium dioxide.

Titanium dioxide — often referred to as “the perfect white” or “the whitest white” — is used as a pigment because its refractive index is extremely high. It has long been present in paints, plastics, paper, toothpaste, and pearlescent cosmetics, but researchers recently discovered the benefits of adding it to skim milk.

According to David Barbano, a professor at Cornell University’s Department of Food Science, “suspension of titanium dioxide in skim milk made the milk whiter, which resulted in improved sensory scores for appearance, creamy aroma, and texture… There is clearly a need to develop a whitener for fat-free milk other than titanium dioxide to provide processors with an ingredient option that would improve sensory properties and provide a nutritional benefit.”

Source: http://www.nanotechproject.org/

Nano Toothpaste Is A Cavity Filter, Bacteria Killer

There are 3 main toothpaste ingredients that may be made of nano-sized particles.

Hydroxyapatite, cavity filler. Hydroxyapatite is a lattice of calcium found naturally in teeth and bones. It helps prevent tooth pain associated with sensitivity. Coating the teeth and slipping into tiny cracks, it breaks down in response to acid before your enamel does, protecting the teeth from decay and cavities+. Hydroxyapatite also provides a source of calcium and phosphate ions which, combined with fluoride, help to remineralise the tooth surface.

Silver, bacteria killer. Silver nanoparticles are proven to have antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of gum disease and bad breath caused by bacteria in the mouth. Its distribution in toothpaste remains largely limited to manufacturers based in Asia, though such products can be purchased online. Like titanium dioxide, it is widely used in a number of other products, including clothing and plasters.

Titanium dioxide, whitener. Titanium dioxide is an intensely white pigment. It has a high refractive index, which means it scatters light to create a very white product. Titanium dioxide is widely used in toothpaste, but often the particles used are not small enough to be defined as nanoparticles.

toothpaste
Since July 2013, EU cosmetics regulation has demanded that all nanoparticles are labelled on the ingredient list.

“Silica particles are found in many food stuffs and, in fact, nanosilica particles have been put into cosmetics and household products for more than 40 years People just aren’t aware of this, because back then no one talked about nanotechnology.” explains Dr Robert Hill, from Queen Mary University of London.
Source; http://www.theguardian.com/