Tag Archives: cement

Timber Cities And Algorithmically Designed Structures

Design Computation Lab is a new research laboratory at The Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London  (UCLdeveloping design methods for the utilization of computational technologies in architectural design, fabrication and assembly. Design Computation Lab has cross-faculty partnerships in the The Institute for Digital Innovation in the Built Environment, UCL and The School of Construction + Project Management, UCL.

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In a recent installation, Real Virtuality, Gilles Retsin Architecture and the Design Computation Lab proved that timber could indeed become the material of the 21st century by using augmented reality to fabricate algorithmically designed structures with LEGO-like timber blocks.

Construction relies heavily on cement, the production of which is responsible for approximately 8 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions. Architect Gilles Retsin suggests that we should look into timber for an alternative.
Sustainable cities can’t rely on concrete. Let’s try algorithmically designed timber buildings.

Source: https://designcomputationlab.org/
AND
https://mashable.com/

How To Make Concrete Leaner, Greener, Stronger And More Elastic

Rice University scientists have developed micron-sized calcium silicate spheres that could lead to stronger and greener concrete, the world’s most-used synthetic material. To Rice materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari and graduate student Sung Hoon Hwang, the spheres represent building blocks that can be made at low cost and promise to mitigate the energy-intensive techniques now used to make cement, the most common binder in concrete.

The researchers formed the spheres in a solution around nanoscale seeds of a common detergent-like surfactant. The spheres can be prompted to self-assemble into solids that are stronger, harder, more elastic and more durable than ubiquitous Portland cement.

Packed, micron-scale calcium silicate spheres developed at Rice University are a promising material that could lead to stronger and more environmentally friendly concrete

Cement doesn’t have the nicest structure,” said Shahsavari, an assistant professor of materials science and nanoengineering. “Cement particles are amorphous and disorganized, which makes it a bit vulnerable to cracks. But with this material, we know what our limits are and we can channel polymers or other materials in between the spheres to control the structure from bottom to top and predict more accurately how it could fracture.”

He said the spheres are suitable for bone-tissue engineering, insulation, ceramic and composite applications as well as cement.

Source: https://news.rice.edu/